A lot of these financial structures ultimately boil down to being a form of government guarantee, which means that they can’t be scaled up to “solve” countries’ power problems because the governments cannot carry all the liabilities. Countries try to introduce the private sector into power generation precisely to reduce such guarantees, which then end up returning through the back door in the form of government support.

Then, in 2002, Texas deregulated the electricity market and everybody cheered!  Except that, sure, deregulation opened up the market to competition that may (or may not) have resulted in lower rates, but it introduced a whole host of other issues.  These issues may not have been factors before but now they’re critical when you’re on the look-out for cheap Houston electricity providers.
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When it comes to pinpointing specific months rather than seasons, every part of the country has its own highest- and lowest-demand months. For example, hotter states, such as Texas, have their lowest demand anytime between December and March.[2] When it comes to your own location, you can determine typical demand trends by taking a look at your area’s weather patterns or your billing records that showcase your personal monthly demand levels.

Knowing how much electricity you use each month is important to finding the cheapest electricity plan. For Houstonians, usage is typically the lowest in the winter and highest in the summer. Your specific usage levels can be determined by simply looking back at previous electric bills and finding the kWh used. To avoid electric bill surprises during the peak summer months, you’ll need to accurately know your peak electricity usage which typically occurs in August.

Prepaid electric, or “pay as you go electricity” is a affordable choice for people with short term living arrangements as well as those wanting to eliminate light bills and need their lights on the same day. Prepaid electricity in Texas is rapidly growing in popularity. Thanks to smartphone apps, Texas college students are choosing to prepay for a fast, easy connection and payment. With smart meter technology, homeowners and renters can easily monitor, regulate and conserve their usage which saves money. Quick Electricity has energy plans to suit the customer preparing for an upcoming move, serving in the military, looking for green energy solutions, or simply wanting to take it month-to-month with no deposit. Don’t fit any of those molds? We can set you up to build your own energy plan!
Lots of sites can say 'CHEAPEST ELECTRICITY IN TEXAS!', but only Texas Electricity Ratings gives you the tools to know you're getting a great company to go with the cheap rate. Because what good is a cheap rate if your bills get screwed up and your payments get lost? We've collected thousands of reviews from customers just like you, who need to save money on their electricity bill but don't want the headaches and hassles of a fly-by-night electricity supplier.
Even though customers in deregulated Texas markets routinely pay more for electricity, there is a bright spot. The gap between the average price paid for electricity between deregulated and regulated market has shrunk to 8.8 percent. In 2006, customers in deregulated cities were paying nearly 47 percent more for electricity than their counterparts in regulated cities.
In summary, fixed-rate plans provide a level of certainty and stability in your energy charge since the price will not fluctuate over the life of your contract. If prices suddenly spike, you are protected because your rate is locked in. The flip side is that if rates drop over the life of your contract, you’ll be stuck paying the higher rate. You can incur steep cancellation fees if you change electricity plans or providers before the end of your contract term.
Net metering is another billing mechanism that supports the development of renewable power generation, specifically, solar power. The mechanism credits solar energy system owners for the electricity their system adds to the grid. Residential customers with rooftop PV system will typically generate more electricity than their home consumes during daylight hours, so net metering is particularly advantageous. During this time where generation is greater than consumption, the home’s electricity meter will run backwards to provide a credit on the homeowner’s electricity bill.[3]
You betcha! Most Texas electricity suppliers offer plans that include a percentage of energy sourced from renewable resources, such as hydro power, wind power and solar power. Some are totally sourced that way. These plans are a great way for Texas energy customers to help the environment without breaking the bank. In addition to green energy plans, many Texas suppliers give customers the option to purchase renewable energy certificates, or RECs, that further offset customers’ carbon emissions. The purchase of RECs also helps fund research and usage of renewable energy sources, so that Texas can stay at the forefront of eco-friendly power technology.
Residents of California paid an average of 19.65 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for their electricity in July, one of the highest rates in the country and well above the U.S. average of 13.12 cents/kWh. However, they use an average of 547 kWh per month, well below the U.S. average of 897. That leaves the state with a Choose Energy Price Index score of 92.9, which places it 17th nationally.
Electricity pricing (sometimes referred to as electricity tariff or the price of electricity) varies widely from country to country and may vary significantly from locality to locality within a particular country. Many factors go into determining an electricity tariff, such as the price of power generation, government subsidies, local weather patterns, transmission and distribution infrastructure, and industry regulation. “Electricity prices generally reflect the cost to build, finance, maintain, and operate power plants and the electricity grid.”[1] Some utilities are for-profit, and their prices will also include a financial return for shareholders and owners. Electricity tariffs vary by type of customer, typically by residential, commercial, and industrial connections. Electricity price forecasting is the method by which a generator, utility company, or large industrial consumer can predict the wholesale prices of electricity with reasonable accuracy. The cost to supply electricity varies minute by minute.[1]
To skirt the late summer electricity rate hikes, a little bit of planning can really pay off. Try to avoid signing new long-term electricity contracts in late summer. While it may be impossible to escape signing a new electricity contract if you’re moving during that time, just know that a short-term plan may make more sense until the rates go back down in the fall.  That way you’re not stuck paying a premium rate for an entire year or more.

How does that work? Spark Energy buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Spark Energy will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.

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